5 Things You Didn’t Know About Diamonds

Diamonds have been used in rings since the middle ages, and the first reference to a diamond engagement ring or wedding ring was in 1477. Because of the supernatural powers accredited to diamonds, they became more popular, and Italians said that a diamond maintained harmony between husband and wife.

Diamonds also have a reputation for supernatural powers, such as protecting from enemies, and negating magnets, which goes back thousands of years. Diamonds also play an important role in Hinduism and Buddhism, in fact the oldest dated book, the Diamond Sutra from 868, also mentions diamonds.

Despite having a reputation as very expensive, diamonds are affordable and can be a worthwhile investment. Whether choosing a diamond solitaire ring, diamond earrings or loose certified diamonds, there are several things to be considered to ensure that you purchase the right diamonds for your needs.

Here are 8 tips to help you choose the perfect diamond.

1. Diamonds are sold by weight, so the weight is also the size of the diamond. A carat is divided up into 100 points. A diamond weighing 50 points is half a carat. As well as the weight, cut, colour and clarity are all very important when choosing a solitaire ring, diamond earrings or other diamond jewellery.

The term carat is used to measure the weight of a diamond, and is the equivalent of 0.2g. The term carat came to English from French and means the fruit of the carob. Carob seeds were traditionally used as a measure of weight because the seeds are all very similar in size. Other countries had their own carat, which was approximately the same size as a carob seed, and it wasn’t until 1914 that the carat was standardised to 0.2g in the United Kingdom

2. The cut of the diamond is the only aspect that can be changed by a human. The weight, colour and clarity are all down to nature. A well cut diamond will have many facets which reflect the light. When a diamond is cut, the light reflects from one side to another, to make it sparkle. A diamond that is cut too deep or too shallow will lose light and so won’t sparkle as much.

3. A diamond seen in a jewellers shop, in earrings or on a solitaire ring, is often transparent, or slightly yellow. The whiter the diamond, the more valuable it is. Diamonds with a strong blue or pink colour to them are called fancies, and are very rare. However, diamonds are available in almost any colour.

4. The clarity of a diamond is determined by the number of inclusions which are caused by multiple growth stages in formation. The value of the diamond depends on the number and severity of these inclusions. The clarity scale ranges from diamonds with no inclusions visible to the naked eye, or with magnification, to diamonds with inclusions that can be seen with the naked eye.

5. Diamonds can be cut differently for different applications. A diamond earring might have a different cut to a solitaire ring. The most popular cuts are brilliant, emerald, pear shape, marquise, princess, oval and heart shape. Brilliant cut diamonds are shaped so that they reflect the light upwards and make the diamond appear white when viewed from the top. Sometimes brilliant cut diamonds appear darker at the centre, which can indicate that the cut is too deep or too shallow and the light isn’t reflecting upwards.

How to Tame a Lovebird

Lovebirds are beautiful creatures and amazing pets. They add beauty and charm to your home. Just the sight of these pretty birds is a refreshing experience. If you tame a Lovebird then the joy they bring into your life have a doubling effect. Lovebirds of any age can be tamed and trained. However, if you have hand reared baby Lovebirds then they are much more easier to tame than adults.

Decide how many Lovebirds you want to tame and start with a single bird at a time. Taming a Lovebird requires its undivided attention. A pair of Lovebirds will socialize with each other and the process becomes more difficult for you. A single bird will consider a human as his companion and will learn the process much quickly and easily and the training becomes a fun experience for your bird.

Taming a Lovebird requires a lot of patience, time and practice for your bird. A tamed Lovebird is well worth the time you spend on taming. The best time to start training is as early as possible. The training should be divided into three to five sessions of no more than ten to fifteen minutes each. The training sessions should be conducted almost daily.

Take your Lovebird into a separate room where there is minimum distractions from external sources. Close all open windows and doors so that your bird may not fly away. Now take the Lovebird out of its cage and talk to him in a low voice. Words like “Good parrot” etc., etc. have a soothing effect on your bird and help to calm him down and get him prepared for training. Do not yell or shout at him.

Establish a trustworthy relationship with your bird. Fearful birds are difficult to tame. Once your bird is comfortable in your presence, put your hand inside his cage with a food item in your hand. Do not make sudden movements that may scare your bird. Do this several times until your Lovebird becomes familiar with your hand and starts eating food from your hand.

The next step is to teach him to step up on your finger. For this, bring your finger near the Lovebird and gently touch him on his chest. The bird will go out of balance and in order to balance himself he will step up and sit on your finger. Now bring him out of its cage and speak a few encouraging words and offer him a treat for complying with the required behavior. Repeat the process several times.

When your Lovebird has learned to sit on your finger, take him into his cage and teach him to step down on its perch. With repetition your bird will easily step up and step down as many times you want. Patience is required to teach these steps. Some birds learn very quickly while others learn a little later depending on the age of your bird. Practice this again and again until it becomes its second nature.

Now teach him to fly to your hand from a distance. Take the food item in your hand and utter the familiar word or whistle. When your Lovebird flies to your hand give him the treat and speak the encouraging words. Practice this step as many times until your bird learns this step fully and flies to your hand instantly. With practice and patience you will finally have a precious hand tamed Lovebird.

Contemporary Paintings Art Guide

Contemporary art paintings cover broadly the years of post World War II up to the present day. The styles of painting in contemporary movements vary widely from one to another. This article covers the major movements of contemporary art, and tries to explain how they link with each other. Some of the key contemporary art eras from the 1950s and 1960s included Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Neo-Dada, Minimalism and the New York School.

Famous artists from this era include Andy Warhol, Wassily Kandinsky, Robert Lichtenstein and Jackson Pollock. The earlier art movements of Cubism & Fauvism are believed to have been part inspiration for many of these new directions. The 1960s represented the start of modern culture, and modern art was a key part of it. Traditional art was now joined in the mainstream with these new contemporary styles that had gained popularity and respect across the board. Since the 1970s many additions to contemporary art have been technology based with digital, software & installation art. In parallel with technology, they continue to develop even today and go off in new directions, or sub-movements.

One relatively new, and already very popular art movement is Street art from artists like Banksy which is a progression of the earlier Graffiti art.Many new movements are seeking to break away from the thinking and methods of traditional art, as Abstract Expressionism had tried to some 60 years ago. The independence of mind and creativity remains strong in contemporary artists today, and they have broken away from simply using different canvas or painting techniques, to use entirely different forms of expression, as shown in the Installation art of artists such as Dan Flavin.

Contemporary art represents the completion of the transition from Baroque and Renaissance painting, through Romaticism & Impressionism up to what we have today, with the likes of digital art movements breaking out frequently. The future for contemporary movements seems likely to blend with the path of technology and other new directions which are impossible to foresee.

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