How to Tame a Lovebird

Lovebirds are beautiful creatures and amazing pets. They add beauty and charm to your home. Just the sight of these pretty birds is a refreshing experience. If you tame a Lovebird then the joy they bring into your life have a doubling effect. Lovebirds of any age can be tamed and trained. However, if you have hand reared baby Lovebirds then they are much more easier to tame than adults.

Decide how many Lovebirds you want to tame and start with a single bird at a time. Taming a Lovebird requires its undivided attention. A pair of Lovebirds will socialize with each other and the process becomes more difficult for you. A single bird will consider a human as his companion and will learn the process much quickly and easily and the training becomes a fun experience for your bird.

Taming a Lovebird requires a lot of patience, time and practice for your bird. A tamed Lovebird is well worth the time you spend on taming. The best time to start training is as early as possible. The training should be divided into three to five sessions of no more than ten to fifteen minutes each. The training sessions should be conducted almost daily.

Take your Lovebird into a separate room where there is minimum distractions from external sources. Close all open windows and doors so that your bird may not fly away. Now take the Lovebird out of its cage and talk to him in a low voice. Words like “Good parrot” etc., etc. have a soothing effect on your bird and help to calm him down and get him prepared for training. Do not yell or shout at him.

Establish a trustworthy relationship with your bird. Fearful birds are difficult to tame. Once your bird is comfortable in your presence, put your hand inside his cage with a food item in your hand. Do not make sudden movements that may scare your bird. Do this several times until your Lovebird becomes familiar with your hand and starts eating food from your hand.

The next step is to teach him to step up on your finger. For this, bring your finger near the Lovebird and gently touch him on his chest. The bird will go out of balance and in order to balance himself he will step up and sit on your finger. Now bring him out of its cage and speak a few encouraging words and offer him a treat for complying with the required behavior. Repeat the process several times.

When your Lovebird has learned to sit on your finger, take him into his cage and teach him to step down on its perch. With repetition your bird will easily step up and step down as many times you want. Patience is required to teach these steps. Some birds learn very quickly while others learn a little later depending on the age of your bird. Practice this again and again until it becomes its second nature.

Now teach him to fly to your hand from a distance. Take the food item in your hand and utter the familiar word or whistle. When your Lovebird flies to your hand give him the treat and speak the encouraging words. Practice this step as many times until your bird learns this step fully and flies to your hand instantly. With practice and patience you will finally have a precious hand tamed Lovebird.

Contemporary Paintings Art Guide

Contemporary art paintings cover broadly the years of post World War II up to the present day. The styles of painting in contemporary movements vary widely from one to another. This article covers the major movements of contemporary art, and tries to explain how they link with each other. Some of the key contemporary art eras from the 1950s and 1960s included Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Neo-Dada, Minimalism and the New York School.

Famous artists from this era include Andy Warhol, Wassily Kandinsky, Robert Lichtenstein and Jackson Pollock. The earlier art movements of Cubism & Fauvism are believed to have been part inspiration for many of these new directions. The 1960s represented the start of modern culture, and modern art was a key part of it. Traditional art was now joined in the mainstream with these new contemporary styles that had gained popularity and respect across the board. Since the 1970s many additions to contemporary art have been technology based with digital, software & installation art. In parallel with technology, they continue to develop even today and go off in new directions, or sub-movements.

One relatively new, and already very popular art movement is Street art from artists like Banksy which is a progression of the earlier Graffiti art.Many new movements are seeking to break away from the thinking and methods of traditional art, as Abstract Expressionism had tried to some 60 years ago. The independence of mind and creativity remains strong in contemporary artists today, and they have broken away from simply using different canvas or painting techniques, to use entirely different forms of expression, as shown in the Installation art of artists such as Dan Flavin.

Contemporary art represents the completion of the transition from Baroque and Renaissance painting, through Romaticism & Impressionism up to what we have today, with the likes of digital art movements breaking out frequently. The future for contemporary movements seems likely to blend with the path of technology and other new directions which are impossible to foresee.

How To Practice Guitar Exercises

How many exercises do you practice on guitar? If you are like many guitar players, the answer is “too many”. In today’s internet era it is far too easy to get hundreds of guitar exercises on any topic imaginable at the push of a button. However, in the never-ending quest to find more guitar playing materials, most guitarists find that their musical skills don’t go anywhere, no matter what they try to do to overcome this problem.

As common as this issue is, the majority of guitar players react to it in a totally opposite way from what is correct. Most musicians make the false assumption that their guitar playing would progress more quickly ‘if only’ they had more/new/better exercises to work on. However, since no energy is directed on discovering the best way to PRACTICE these exercises, the time spent practicing delivers very slow improvement.

Rather than constantly seeking to expand your list of guitar practice materials, you will improve your guitar playing much more quickly if you focus on getting maximum results from the items you are already learning. Doing this will give you 2 important advantages:

1. You will improve as a musician in less time, simply because you will have a smaller total number of exercises to work on.

2. Whenever you face a real challenge in your guitar playing, you will know exactly what needs to be done to create your own exercise to deal with the issue.

The Way You Practice Guitar Matters More Than The Exercises You Work On

When you practice guitar, you must be able to clearly explain (at least to yourself) the reasons why you are working on a particular practice item at any given time. Being able to give such an explanation helps to keep your practicing directed in a specific path, instead of letting it become a random and unfocused waste of time.

To explain more clearly what I mean, consider a very common example of practicing scales on guitar (something that all guitar players have done at one point or another). Although virtually everyone understands that scales are an important item to practice for musicians, few guitar players consciously know how to direct their practicing of scales to help them improve the following specific areas of their musicianship:

1. Learning to play guitar fast

2. Learning to improvise guitar solos (or improving their ability to do so)

3. Visualizing the guitar neck completely

4. Expanding their creativity in music

A specific list of actions is needed to help you achieve each of the above objectives. To make that happen, your mind needs to act as a compass to direct your hands to take the appropriate steps during each practice session dedicated to scales. When doing this, it is necessary to set specific miniature objectives for every individual practice session. To avoid any misunderstanding, these “miniature objectives” are NOT the same thing as the big, long-term vision you want to reach as a guitar player (several years from now). Instead (as described above), they are similar to a map and a compass that tells you exactly how to move (what actions to take) to reach a very small specific goal. When you become comfortable doing this, you will see that it is very possible to get better in many elements of your musicianship with only one guitar practice item. However since most guitar players do not have this mindset while practicing, their practice sessions often turn into little more than a mindless list of items to play through, with no understanding of how each exercise is (or should be) bringing them closer to their goals. This alone accounts for a huge portion of the reason why most musicians never realize their guitar playing potential.

The skill of being able to set individual goals for each item in every guitar practice session does not come intuitively to most people and this is also why studying guitar on your own is a poor choice for many musicians. However, regardless of whether you take guitar lessons or not, by making an effort to go through the above process in your practicing will already improve the results you get in your guitar playing.

To illustrate the above process in action, I will describe a few examples of how it is possible to use a common guitar practice exercise such as scales to grow as a guitar player in a variety of areas. As explained earlier, this will be achieved by focusing your mind on a specific list of objectives in every practice routine.

Using Guitar Scales To Learn The Fretboard

When you practice scales to improve your ability to visualize the guitar neck, your focus should become much less on the physical aspect of your guitar playing and much more on memorizing how the shapes of the scales you are practicing look (visually) in EVERY area of the guitar, regardless of what key you are in. When your mind is actively engaged in this task, you will have no choice but to be 100% focused on what you are doing, rather than going on autopilot with your hands while practicing scales.

Using Guitar Scales To Improve Your Guitaristic Creativity

To become a more creative guitar player from practicing scales, one approach to take is to force yourself to ‘create’ multiple new scale sequences, patterns and phrases out of scales. This is different from simply playing the scale shapes themselves up and down in a mindless, uninspired fashion. You can keep yourself busy for many months doing only this task and come up with hundreds of new scale sequence ideas in the process. The point behind this advice is to illustrate yet another way of how your mind is consciously focusing on a completely different set of tasks when working on a unique mini objective.

Using Guitar Scales To Refine Guitar Technique

If you practice scales, trying to refine your physical guitar playing, you must consciously focus your mind on each element of great technique in turn: minimizing extra tension, avoiding excessive hand/finger motions, picking articulation and the ability of both hands to work in sync. The main thing I want you to understand here is the critical distinction between working on scales specifically to improve in one of the elements above as opposed to robotically moving your fingers through dull sets of fingering patterns that most guitar players do. Understanding and applying this difference is what it takes to more effectively train your hands for better guitar playing with scales.

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